Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Wide World Of Football
#11
YET ANOTHER UPDATE:

I think the good Lord that I missed listening to the Razorback game on the radio (I don't get regular TV). 34-13 Volunteers. What a fucking disaster. Dick couldn't pass the ball worth a shit (as usual), and Felix Jones carried three times for three yards before leaving the game with a deep leg bruise that he got on the first kickoff return. At least McFadden did somewhat better, rushing for 117 yards to keep his Heisman dreams alive.

Inconsistency.

That's the key word for the Razorbacks. They did fantastic last week against South Carolina, but all of a sudden, they play like complete and utter SHIT this week. It's really starting to piss me off. If they don't fire Houston Nutt at the end of the year, I shall personally drive to Fayettville and make him regret even being born.
Reply
#12
UPDATE:

Houston Nutt is getting his ass CANNED, baby! People were talking about how his contract was bought out, and when my little sister said she saw it on TV at a friend's house, I was dancing for joy. Even better, Arkansas beat Miss. State (thankfully).
Reply
#13
UPDATE:

     "LITTLE ROCK -- Arkansas Coach Houston Nutt denied media reports that he will will not return for an 11th season next year and criticized what he termed "foolish" rumors after the Razorbacks' 45-31 win over Mississippi State."
                                      -Arkansas Democrat Gazette

What the hell? I thought he said he was quitting. I guess the only reason I believed that was because they said that ON THE FUCKING TV! Thanks for filling me with false hope, you godless media assholes. You should be a bit more careful with what you air on TV. (NOT speaking to anyone on this site)
Reply
#14
A bit off topic, but I got no idea who/where to ask so I guess here's as good a place as any.

I'm an English guy who is intrigued by the sport of gridiron, have watched some stuff, got a grip on the basic rules and enjoyed what I saw, but there does not seem to be any "n00bs" place that I can kinda go and find out stuff that I need to know. All the TV coverage and stuff that I find always just seems to assume you already know what's happening and it is kinda annoying in certain situations where I don't know the bloody foggiest aboot what's going on.

So yeah, request: Anyone know of a site or something that I can get up to speed on what exactly the rules are and if possible a nice who's who, too.
Reply
#15
(12-06-2007, 06:33 AM)Davey link Wrote: A bit off topic, but I got no idea who/where to ask so I guess here's as good a place as any.

I'm an English guy who is intrigued by the sport of gridiron, have watched some stuff, got a grip on the basic rules and enjoyed what I saw, but there does not seem to be any "n00bs" place that I can kinda go and find out stuff that I need to know. All the TV coverage and stuff that I find always just seems to assume you already know what's happening and it is kinda annoying in certain situations where I don't know the bloody foggiest aboot what's going on.

So yeah, request: Anyone know of a site or something that I can get up to speed on what exactly the rules are and if possible a nice who's who, too.




I don't know of any site like that. I'm no expert, but I'd be happy to answer any questions you've got.
[Image: blocked.jpg]
Reply
#16
Let's see.. the basics of gridiron football.



A gridiron football field is divided into ten 10-yard segments, the end of each contains another 10-yard area known as the end zone, the beginning of which is marked by the goal line. The center of the back line of the end zone has the goal posts set up on it. Each yard is marked with a line on the field. The 50-yard line is known as mid-field because it sits in the exact center of the field.


[Image: football_field.jpg]



There are four 15-minute quarters in a football game. The first two quarters are the first half, the second two the second half, and there is a period of rest between halves referred to as 'halftime'.


The clock begins to run at the kickoff and is stopped when a ball carrier runs out of bounds, there is an incomplete forward pass, or when a time-out is called, either by a team or by the officials. Each team gets three time-outs per half.



At the start of a game, a coin is tossed. The winning team may choose to receive the ball or to defer possession to the opponent. The ball is the kicked off to the team who won possession from the other team. The ball is placed on a tee at the kicking team's 20-yard line and is then kicked to the other team who waits at the other end of the field. The receiving team has three basic options: they can elect to return the ball, in which case a player will catch the ball and attempt to run it as far as he can before he is tackled. They can elect to let the ball go, in which case no player on the receiving team will touch it. It will eventually bounce/roll to a stop, this will be the yard line at which the receiving team goes on offense. Last, a player who is in position to catch the kickoff while it's in the air can call for a 'fair catch'. If he does so, players on the kicking team cannot touch him, they must let him attempt to catch the ball. If he does, he cannot advance it and the receiving team takes over at the yard line on which the catch was made.



A few notes about kickoffs:
1 - A kickoff like this is done after every touchdown, at the start of the game and at the beginning of the second half. Whichever team kicks off to the other at the beginning of the game will be the receiving team on the kickoff that starts the second half.
2 - During kickoffs, both teams deploy players collectively referred to as 'special teams'. These can be offensive or defensive players, rarely players are signed as exclusively special teams players.
3 - Once any player on the receiving team touches the ball, it is considered a LIVE BALL. This means that if the receiving player drops it, or if it bounces off his shoulder or even if it rolls and touches his foot, the ball is fair game for both teams. Whichever team jumps on the ball can gain possession.
4 - If a kickoff goes out-of-bounds while in the air - meaning it doesn't land in the field of play - then the receiving team is awarded the ball on their own 40 yard line.
5 - If during a kickoff the ball sails through the opposite end zone without being touched by any player, or if a player who catches the ball while in the end zone kneels down before leaving the end zone, this is referred to as a touchback. The ball is placed on the reciving team's 20-yard line.






Offense and Defense:


On any given play, there are twenty two men on the field, 11 for each team. The team with the ball is the Offense, the ones without are the Defense.


Once a team has possession, a marker is placed at the yard line on which the team gained possession: this yard marker is known as the Line of Scrimmage. Another marker is placed ten yards ahead of the line of scrimmage. The offense is  given four plays to move the ball forward beyond that marker. Each of these plays is called a 'down': first down, second down, third down and fourth down. If on any of these plays a ball carrier passes this marker, once the play is over the marker is moved ten more yards forward from the spot the play was ended and the offense receives a new set of downs. The expression '1st and 10' or '3rd and 20' refers to the down and distance; it is currently first down and the offense needs 10 yards for another first down, or it is currently third down and the offense needs 20 yards for a new first down. Getting a new first down is often referred to as 'moving the chains' because the markers used by the officials to keep track of the distance needed are connected by a chain.


If the offense has not gained enough yards for a new first down after the fourth down play has been run, they must relinquish possession and the other team goes on offense at the last dead ball spot. This is known as a 'turnover on downs'.


The offense can run a normal play on each of the four downs if it so chooses. In most cases, if the team reaches 4th down, it will elect to punt the ball away to the other team to push them away from the end zone as far as possible. Punts are a lot like kickoffs, except the ball is drop-kicked instead of put on a tee.






Players:


The offense players can vary depending on the play they want to run, but there are six of the eleven possible players who MUST be present for each down: the five offensive lineman and the quarterback.

The offensive linemen consist of the center, who lines up directly over the ball; two offensive tackles, who line up to either side of the center, and two offensive guards, who line up next to the tackles. The offensive line's job is to protect the quarterback when he is looking to make a forward pass (this is known as pass protection) or to attack the defensive lineman and open running lanes for a ball carries (this is known as run blocking).

The quarterback lines up behind the center. He is the most critical part of the offense as he is usually the first man to touch the ball during any play. The QB is responsible for knowing what formation the defense is in, where his other players are, and for relaying the play called by the coaches on the sideline to the rest of the team on the field.

The other five players on offense can consist of wide recivers, who are typically fast and tall players that run down the field to receive a forward pass from the quarterback; tight ends, who are mid-sized guys that can be used as extra blockers or receivers; halfbacks, who are typically fast players that are handed the ball in the backfield; and fullbacks, who are bigger versions of running backs who spend more time blocking than advancing the ball. The exact specifics of what position players are on the field varies depending on the play call; you will hear of "4 wide" or "5 wide", meaning four or five wide receivers are on the field, almost guaranteeing the play will be an attempted pass, or "double tight end set" meaning there are two tights ends in the game, etc.

Defensive players and formations vary widely. Players that line up directly opposite of the offensive lineman are known as defensive lineman. The nose tackle lines up in the center, the defensive tackles line up on either side of him, and defensive ends line up next to the defensive tackles; depending on defensive formation there are usually 3 or 4 defensive lineman. Linebackers roam the field behind the defensive line and are usually three or four in number; the ones in the middle is the middle linebackers, the ones on the outside are known as outside linebackers. Cornerbacks are defensive players that line up on the far ends of the field, usually near the sidelines, whose primary job is to 'cover' the opposing players to ensure no forward pass is completed to them. The safeties, known as the free safety and (RIP Sean Taylor) strong safety, play furthest away from the line of scrimmage and are used primarily to cover deep passes.







Play:

On the QB's signal, the ball is handed to him (or 'snapped') by the center; once the center snaps the ball, the ball is LIVE. The QB may then hand-off or toss the ball to another player, he can attempt to throw a forward pass, or he can advance the ball by running it forward himself.

The quarterback (or any other player) may attempt a forward pass as long as he has not advanced the ball beyond the line of scrimmage. If an offensive player catches the ball, it is a completed pass and that player may then attempt to advance the ball more. If a defensive player catches it, it is called an interception and the defense may then advance the ball towards the offensive team's end zone; once the defensive player with the ball is considered down, that defensive team that intercepted the pass takes over on offense. If no receiver catches the ball, it is considered an incomplete pass.

If a player on offense who has possession of the ball and has not been declared down drops the ball, it is called a fumble. The ball is still live and can be advanced by either team.

When a player advancing the ball is brought to the ground by a defending player and either his body or one knee touch the ground, the player is considered down and the ball is DEAD. It cannot be advanced further by either team and the yard line on which it was called dead is made the new line of scrimmage. If a quarterback is tackled behind the line of scrimmage while in possession of the ball, this is called a 'sack'. Note that this can result in a loss of yards: if on a 1st and 10 on the 20 yard line, the quarterback is sacked while standing on the 15 yard line, this would result in the next play being 2nd and 15 from the 15 yard line.







Scoring:

The offense's overall goal is to have a ball carrier push the ball over the goal line of the opponent's end zone. The defense's job is to stop that from happening. The ball carrier himself does NOT have to cross the goal line, only the ball does, and the ball doesn't have to completely cross it. All it has to do is break the plane of the goal line. If the offensive team can do this, they've scored a touchdown and are awarded 6 points. They may then opt to kick an extra point, which is kicking a field goal from I *believe* the 5-yard line of the opponent, or they may opt to run a play instead and attempt what is called a 2-point conversion. If they can push the ball over the goal line on the conversion try, they are awarded two points instead of one. If not, they get nothing. Most teams opt to kick the extra point unless circumstances would obviously direct them to do otherwise.

At any point during their possession, the offensive team may elect for a 'field goal try'. In this, the team brings out their kicker in an attempt to place-kick the ball through the upright goal posts at the back of the other team's end zone. If they are successful, they earn 3 points. If not, they turn the ball over to the other team at the spot where the kick was attempted. NOTE: if a field goal attempt falls short and lands inside the field of play, it is a live ball and can be picked up and advanced by the defense.


If the defense tackles an opposing ball carrier in the offensive team's own end zone, this is known as a safety. The defending team is awarded two points and is then given possession by way of a free kick (a punt from the offensive team's 20-yard line).






Well.. if I made any mistakes here, feel free to correct me, but I think this is the gist.


[Image: blocked.jpg]
Reply
#17
Thanks man, that is awesome. It looks as though I had the play rules down fine, but the kickoff rules, and especially the player positions and stuff are really helpful. I also didn't know aboot the 2 point rule for being downed in your own end zone.

One quick last Q: About anyone(but the QB) passing. I've seen it a few times, it seems to be rugby rules(pass may not be made forward) or are there special regulations?
Reply
#18
(12-07-2007, 01:39 AM)Davey link Wrote: One quick last Q: About anyone(but the QB) passing. I've seen it a few times, it seems to be rugby rules(pass may not be made forward) or are there special regulations?



Basically, there can only be one forward pass per play. However, there can be any number of lateral tosses/passes during a play.

In order for a player to be eligible to throw a forward pass, he can't have lined up on the line of scrimmage. The offense has to line up at least 6 players on the line of scrimmage for each play - the five offensive lineman and at least one other. Those six wouldn't be legal to throw a forward pass.

What the QB will do is either hand off, toss backwards or throw a backwards pass to another player behind the line, then THAT player will throw the forward pass.


If you want to see a good example of how you can transfer the ball around multiple times during a play as long as all the tosses go backwards or sideways, check out the end of the '82 Cal vs Stanford game. This is known in football history simply as 'The Play'.

[Image: blocked.jpg]
Reply
#19
Wow, that almost looked like rugby at the end there. I'm honestly not used to seeing those lateral tosses(over here they are called rugby passes) in gridiron.

If you like plays like those, BTW I'd suggest rugby as these are pretty much the norm, not usually so impressive, but that's how the game is played.
Reply
#20
(12-07-2007, 03:25 AM)Davey link Wrote: Wow, that almost looked like rugby at the end there. I'm honestly not used to seeing those lateral tosses(over here they are called rugby passes) in gridiron.

If you like plays like those, BTW I'd suggest rugby as these are pretty much the norm, not usually so impressive, but that's how the game is played.



I love rugby, actually Smile We just don't get enough of it on TV here.
[Image: blocked.jpg]
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)